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A Guesthouse In The Isle Of Skye With A Great View

This self-build property is owned by Andreas Adalian, who wanted a home in Scotland that could also serve as a guesthouse. He envisioned it to be a modern yet cosy dwelling taking full advantage of the views from the inside. The ambiance was intended to be serene and relaxing. Andreas sought the help of Skye-based architect Rural Design for its development.

The core idea of the construction was to mix the old with the new. That was why Andreas had asked for the floors to be done with traditional oak and for the living area to include an open fire. The home has a total of five bedrooms and has the structure of a 1.75-storey building, which is different from Skye's classic house style of one-and-a-half storeys. It's primarily made of timber frame, consisting of rendered blockwork and untreated larch cladding. The roof is designed with a slate-effect Marley Eternit fibre cement sheet.

Andres specifically intended that all possible views be fully enjoyed inside. Guests would be able to gaze at the mountains of Harris and Loch Dunvegan towards the north, while they'd have an equally picturesque view of Cuillin Mountains towards the south. Full-sized windows enable such sights in the bedrooms on the upper floor. On the ground level, an extensive glazing of both bedroom and living areas totally provides a panorama of the landscape.

Against the back of the house rests a black-stained timber single-storey lean-to. Here is where ancillary spaces such as the toilets and the kitchen are located. Meanwhile, the oak floors and timber beams allow the living areas to strike a balance between cosy and traditional. In order that the house stays warm, radiators and underfloor heating are fuelled by a Worcester, Bosch Group LPG gas boiler. The house thoroughly incorporates high levels of insulation, and tap water is heated with the help two solar thermal panels.

The house has two staircases leading to the upper floor, where there are a guestroom and a separate suite. The main one is situated in the hallway, while the other is accessed privately from a pocket door at the entrance. That raises a thought why not replace one of those staircases with an air powered lift?

Futuristic lifts available from http://www.airlevator.com/ operate on innovative vacuum technology, which is why they'd make a stunning addition to any home. They're energy efficient, safe to use, simple and easy to install. Not only are they more convenient compared to stairs but also, they take up less space. They're easy on the legs and would greatly benefit the elderly, disabled or those who need assistance in climbing steps.

These air powered elevators are called futuristic for a reason. Their transparent outer tube design enables them function as any other window, except they provide a full 360-degree view. Their clean, cutting-edge look would make quite an impression to guests at a home. Imagine how enjoyable having one would be in house like AndreasÕs, especially with such stunning surroundings? 'All our visitors are taken aback by this ambience,' he says. Surely, a lift like these would only enhance such ambience.